riff, PD#18245

  • © Bob Gramsma
  • © Bob Gramsma
  • © Bob Gramsma
  • © Bob Gramsma
  • © Bob Gramsma
  • © Bob Gramsma
  • © Bob Gramsma
  • © Bob Gramsma
  • © Bob Gramsma
  • © Bob Gramsma
  • © Bob Gramsma
  • © Bob Gramsma
  • © Bob Gramsma
  • © Bob Gramsma
  • © Bob Gramsma
  • © Bob Gramsma
  • © Bob Gramsma
  • © Bob Gramsma
  • © Bob Gramsma
  • © Bob Gramsma
  • © Bob Gramsma
  • © Bob Gramsma
  • © Bob Gramsma
  • © Bob Gramsma
  • © Bob Gramsma
  • © Bob Gramsma
  • © Bob Gramsma
  • © Bob Gramsma
  • © Bob Gramsma
  • © Bob Gramsma
  • © Bob Gramsma
  • © Bob Gramsma
  • © Bob Gramsma
  • © Bob Gramsma
  • © Bob Gramsma
  • © Bob Gramsma
  • © Bob Gramsma
  • © Bob Gramsma
  • © Bob Gramsma
  • © Bob Gramsma
  • © Bob Gramsma
  • © Bob Gramsma
  • © Bob Gramsma
  • © Bob Gramsma
  • © Bob Gramsma

riff, PD#18245, 2018/19
Shot crete, soil, steel, reinforcement, foundation, 37,5 x 13 x 7 m Dutch monument to mark 100 years Zuiderzee Act, Land Art Flevoland Collection, curator Taak, comission Province of Flevoland, the Netherlands Like a strange archaeological discovery, riff, PD#18245 protrudes from the artificial topography of the Ijsselmeerpolder. The land art monument was created by the Swiss-Dutch artist Bob Gramsma at the invitation of the province of Flevoland to commemorate the centenary of Zuriderzee Act passed by the Dutch parliament. The act endorsed the decision to close off the Zuiderzee with a dike and initiated the land reclamation of the polders. Riff, PD#18245 is part of Land Art Flevoland, a collection of nine land-art works by internationally renowned artists. The work was created and developed by Gramsma in collaboration with WaltGalmarini engineers and fifteen subcontractors and consultants from Switzerland, Germany, Belgium, and the Netherlands over a period of two years. It is a statically highly complex structure, which combines the static of a boat with those of a bridge. First, 18 concrete piles were rammed into the ground. On top of the pile foundation steel structures and two concrete walls were erected. Around these, a huge mound of local soil and Zuiderszee ground was heaped up. In this mound, a big hole with pits were dug. Concrete was poured and pneumatically injected into the cavities. An inverted sculptural reproduction of the shaped void was created. After t